In conversation with…Ese Ibor

In this edition of the Newsletter we have been speaking to Ese Edoja Ibor, Project Officer at the Child Protection Centre and Emergency Accommodation Shelter in Calabar. Here Ese talks to Safe Child Africa about the highs and lows of working on the front line with some of the world’s most vulnerable children. 

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Q: How long have you been involved with BRCI?

I have been involved with the BRCI since its inception in 2011.

Q: What is it like to work at BRCI?

 First and Foremost I will say that we are blessed with amazing staff and volunteers that are dedicated and committed to their work and are able to multitask. This ensures that we are able to meet our project deliverables of helping children and young people.

Q: Could you describe what the Child Protection Centre does,

Yes, a typical day in the Child Protection Centre could start when a case of child abuse is referred to us and we receive the case in the office. We record the case in the logbook, take the child statements and other witnesses statements and attach these to the logbook. We then take photographs especially if it is a case of physical abuse and attach these to the logbook. If it is a case that requires urgent medical attention, such a grievous bodily harm or rape, we take the child to the hospital for treatment. We then report the matter to the Police. if it is a case that requires us to admit the child into the EA, we do that, especially if the child was abused by their caregivers. If it’s still possible that same day, we commence our investigation by inviting the perpetrators to the office to take down their statements and to get more information and details about the case. Sometimes, we go out to carry out interventions, for instance in schools that are aware of the work we do. Other days, we carry out monitoring and follow up visits or resolve issues between families, such as in cases of neglect. The legal team also attend court for cases that are in court, prepare and file processes and do legal counselling. The legal team are also in charge of following up any cases with the police.

Q: What about the EA, could you give us an insight into a typical day for a child staying there?

A typical day in the EA would be; a child wakes up in the morning, does their chores (age appropriate chores), takes their bath and has breakfast. They then play with other children and may watch television. Later they have lunch and dinner and then go to bed. Sometimes in the evenings and on Saturdays, we can arrange for the children to come outside to play. But security and safety are high priorities. The children are also taken out to Children's programs whenever they are invited. They are also sometimes taken out for recreational activities at recreational centres. The children are also home schooled pending when they are placed with a Foster Carer or re-united with a relative.

 Q: What is the most rewarding part of your role as Project Officer?

The most rewarding part of my role is to see the number of children the project has impacted positively especially the ones I personally intervened. When I see the children's growth and how they were able to overcome and survive their traumatic situations, it makes me really happy.

Q: What about the biggest challenges?

The most challenging part of my role is not being able to do as much as I want to due to some health challenges. However, there are big challenges in the project. Lack of resources to employ more support staff to support the increasing number of cases handled in the project, is the major challenge.

 

 

 

 

Thank You.

 

Eseoghene Edoja-Ibor,

Project Co-ordinator,

Basic Rights Counsel Initiative.

 



Q: What is the most rewarding part of your role? And what is the most challenging?

The most rewarding part of my role is to see the number of children the project has impacted positively,especially the ones I personally intervened. When I see the children's growth and how they were able to overcome and survive their traumatic situations, it makes me really happy. The most challenging part of my role is not being able to do as much as i want to due to some health challenges. However, there are challenges in the project. Lack of resources to employ more support staff to support the increasing number of cases handled in the project.

Q: Is there anything specific in your current role that is a particular challenge because of funding or lack of resources?  

The most challenging part of my role is not being able to do as much as i want to due to some health challenges. However, there are challenges in the project. Lack of resources to employ more support staff to support the increasing number of cases handled in the project.


Q: You must deal with a lot of cases child neglect and abuse, is there anyone case that stands out in your mind as one you felt had a positive outcome, against the odds?

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Q: Where would you like BRCI to be in 10 years time - what would you like it to have achieved?  

On where I will like to see BRCI in 10 years; I will like BRCI to be the foremost Child Rights organization in Nigeria. It will also be good to have our own space and facilities (own a building with offices, conference rooms, the EA, a drop in center, etc). It will also be good to own project vehicles.


If you would like to help support the work that Ese and James do at BRCI, please donate here.


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